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Home / News / Environment / Canada task force urges billions in environmental spending to boost recovery

Canada task force urges billions in environmental spending to boost recovery

Canada task force urges billions in environmental spending to boost recovery
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OTTAWA (Reuters) – A Canadian environmental working group called on Wednesday for billions in spending over the next five years to spur a green economic recovery, a week before Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is due to outline his own plan to parliament. Gerald Butts, formerly Trudeau’s top adviser who is no longer in government, was a member of the “Task Force for a Resilient Recovery,” an independent body with 15 members who are experts in finance, sustainability and policy and funded by five family foundations, according to the group. It recommends, among other things, investing in green retrofits for homes and buildings and fostering the use and production of zero-emission vehicles. Last month, Trudeau promised a sweeping long-term recovery plan, but the resurgence of COVID-19 in recent days may force him to focus on more immediate needs next week, sources said. Canada has slowly reopened for business after some 3 million Canadians lost their jobs during the lockdown phase of the pandemic. But with schools reopening and local flare-ups, the country reported 1,351 new cases on Monday, the highest single daily addition since May 1. “The question is what actions Canada’s governments can take over the next 1-to-5 years […]

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