fbpx Ex-Murrieta detective admits taking bribes in immigration fraud scheme
The Votes Are In!
2023 Readers' Choice is back, bigger and better than ever!
View Winners →
Vote for your favorite business!
2023 Readers' Choice is back, bigger and better than ever!
Start voting →
Subscribeto our newsletter to stay informed
  • Enter your phone number to be notified if you win
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Home / News / Crime / Ex-Murrieta detective admits taking bribes in immigration fraud scheme

Ex-Murrieta detective admits taking bribes in immigration fraud scheme

by City News Service
share with

An ex-Murrieta detective accused of taking bribes to facilitate a South American art dealer’s entry to the United States pleaded guilty Friday to a federal charge.

Paul John Gollogly, 74, of Temecula, admitted a single count of bribery under a plea agreement with the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

U.S. District Judge Sunshine Sykes scheduled a sentencing hearing for Jan. 19 at the federal courthouse in downtown Riverside. It was unclear whether Gollogly would be jailed while awaiting the court date, or remain on bond.

Prosecutors will seek a term of imprisonment of 18 months or less, per the plea deal, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

The agency said that Gollogly started working for the Murrieta Police Department in 2013 after a law enforcement career in Florida.

Federal prosecutors said the defendant was tapped to lead the department’s anti-money laundering program, where he engaged confidential informants, including noncitizens in need of authorization to enter and work in the country.

In April 2013, Gollogly registered a Colombian national known as “Person A” as an informant. Court documents described the party as an affluent art dealer with connections in the U.S., Mexico, Panama and other locations, as well as ownership of an art gallery in New York.

The dealer was not a legal permanent resident of the United States. Prosecutors said Gollogly had worked with the merchant while on the police force in Florida.

“From April 2013 to February 2020, Gollogly helped Person A obtain various immigration benefits, including authorization from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to allow (the art dealer) to enter and work in the United States for one year at a time, and facilitation of A’s physical entry into the United States,” according to a U.S. Attorney’s Office statement. “Gollogly also attempted to assist with A’s permanent residency application.”

In documents submitted to DHS, the then-Murrieta detective hailed the dealer as a pivotal entity behind arrests and drug seizures during investigations, all of which was untrue, prosecutors said.

When the party arrived at the San Ysidro Port of Entry at the U.S.-Mexico border, Gollogly personally picked up A on five separate occasions to facilitate entry, without complications, to the U.S., according to court documents.

In exchange for his services to the dealer, Gollogly received tickets to art shows, free accommodations at the individual’s hotel in Mexico, payments to cover the policeman’s relative’s living expenses in New York City over a four-month span and an all-paid dinner at an upscale New York restaurant in December 2019, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

More from Crime

Skip to content