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Home / News / Crime / Ex-CEO of LA nonprofit agrees to plead guilty to embezzlement

Ex-CEO of LA nonprofit agrees to plead guilty to embezzlement

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The former president and CEO of a Hollywood-based anti-poverty agency has agreed to plead guilty to federal criminal charges for embezzling money from the nonprofit for his personal benefit and intentionally misapplying more than $600,000 in grant money to pay for unauthorized expenses and lying on his tax returns, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday.

Howard Dixon Slingerland, 53, of Studio City, has agreed to plead guilty to federal charges of conversion and intentional misapplication of funds from an organization receiving federal money, and subscribing to a false federal income tax return, according to the DOJ.

Slingerland is expected to make his initial appearance in Los Angeles federal court in the coming weeks.

According to his plea agreement, from 1996 until he was fired in September 2019, Slingerland was the president and CEO of Youth Policy Institute Inc., a Hollywood-based nonprofit agency that worked to eradicate poverty in some of the highest needs neighborhoods in Los Angeles with a comprehensive approach addressing education, youth development, safety, job training, and health and wellness.

In these roles, Slingerland had check-signing authority over YPI’s bank accounts and was the personal guarantor of YPI’s credit card.

From January 2015 to February 2019, Slingerland caused at least $71,533 of YPI funds to be spent on unauthorized expenditures, including his personal property tax bill that exceeded $14,000, more than $6,000 for a family dinner at a New York City restaurant, nearly $11,000 for a family member’s tutoring and nearly $2,000 on a home computer and software, federal prosecutors said.

In July 2019, Slingerland caused about $401,561 in funds YPI had received from a federal grant to be used for the unauthorized payment of YPI payroll. That same month, he also caused roughly $201,466 in federal grant money to be illegally used to pay off YPI’s credit card bill, including for expenses Slingerland had incurred, according to his plea agreement.

Slingerland further admitted that he underreported on his individual federal income tax returns more than $100,000 in income each year for the tax years 2015 through 2018 by not reporting money he obtained from YPI including through the embezzlement. Slingerland admitted to owing the United States Treasury a total of about $147,398 in unpaid taxes — not including penalties and interest — for these years.

After Slingerland enters his guilty plea, he will face up to 10 years in federal prison on the conversion count and three years in federal prison on the tax count, prosecutors noted.

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