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Home / News / Travel / Van Nuys Airport reopens runway after $13 Million, six-month project

Van Nuys Airport reopens runway after $13 Million, six-month project

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The Van Nuys Airport celebrated the reopening of a runway Monday following six months of reconstruction work.

The $13.1 million project rebuilt the entire 4,000-foot length of Runway 16L/34R, adding LED lighting, airfield signage, surface markings and a run-up safety area.

The repair work is expected to extend the runway — one of the airport’s two — for another two decades.

“As one of the busiest general aviation airports in the country, Van Nuys Airport is proud to provide our tenants and visitors with facilities that will enhance safety and efficiency for decades to come,” said Justin Erbacci, CEO of Los Angeles World Airports.

The Van Nuys Airport, which is dedicated to non-commercial air travel, had more than 300,000 takeoffs and landings in 2021.

The base of the runway was made of 100% recyclable materials.

The repairs are also expected to assist pilots going through flight school training and life-saving flight operations based at Van Nuys Airport, according to officials.

“LAWA’s investment in this runway asset, together with the commitment of its tenant business partners at VNY who are leading efforts to introduce environmental improvements, maximizes the airport’s status as a leading center for new industry pilots, jobs and positive economic benefits to the City of Los Angeles,” said Curt Castagna, president of the Van Nuys Airport Association.

The celebration Monday featured a ceremonial first flight in which a pilot with the Hot Shot Aviation flight school took off from the renovated runaway in a 1979 Cessna 152 — an aircraft modified to use a more environmentally sustainable fuel designed for piston-powered aircraft.

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