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Home / Neighborhood / San Gabriel Valley / Monrovia Weekly / City of Monrovia issues a Proclamation of Existence of Local Emergency after rainstorm

City of Monrovia issues a Proclamation of Existence of Local Emergency after rainstorm

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The City of Monrovia issued a Proclamation of Existence of Local Emergency in response to the rainstorm on Dec. 13 and Dec. 14 and is activating a virtual Emergency Operation Center. 

There has been significant movement of mud and debris, along with rocks and boulders, in Monrovia Canyon Park. There is also a substantial amount of debris and mudflow within the area as well, causing damage to facilities, roads, parking areas, utility systems and trails.

Additionally, staff has identified a broken water main in Monrovia Canyon Park which was caused by the debris flow. The water system in Monrovia Canyon Park, including the running water in bathrooms and drinking fountains, has been compromised. 

Monrovia Canyon Park has been closed to the public since Thursday, Dec. 9, and will remain closed indefinitely. Although Monrovia Canyon Park is closed, signs for “Do Not Drink the Water” will be placed within the park until the water main can be repaired.

A Proclamation of Existence of Local Emergency recognizes the existence of a local emergency and assists the city to mobilize resources and provide emergency response. The local state of emergency enables the city to seek reimbursement for expenditures made when responding to the emergency.

City of Monrovia staff — including Public Works, Community Services, Police and Fire, along with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works — continue to monitor activities in Monrovia Canyon Park and the neighborhoods of Ridgeside and Oakglade Drives.

Thus far, the neighborhoods of Ridgeside Drive and Oakglade Drive have not experienced significant debris or mudflow onto the streets. Throughout the rain event, the Oakglade Debris Basin, a drainage structure, has captured the debris and mudflow. At this time, these neighborhoods remain under an Evacuation Warning.

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