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Home / Neighborhood / Los Angeles / Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant conducts maintenance test for 1-mile outfall

Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant conducts maintenance test for 1-mile outfall

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A successful routine maintenance test of the gates in the 1-mile outfall pipeline from the Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant was conducted Wednesday, with officials saying there were no noise, odor or other impacts on the surrounding area.

The plant annually tests its three bypass gates to ensure they are properly functioning. During the tests, which will be repeated Thursday from 5 a.m. to 1 p.m., 250,000 gallons of fully treated and disinfected wastewater are released through the 1-mile outfall and then pumped back into the plant before reaching the ocean.

Wednesday’s test did not produce any additional odors, noise or negative impacts, according to the Department of Public Works.

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health did not close the beaches during the test, since the wastewater was fully treated and was not expected to reach the ocean, but the department monitored bacterial levels on Wednesday and will again Thursday.

The 1-mile outfall is typically used for excess stormwater, downstream maintenance, repairs or emergency use.

The northbound lane of Vista Del Mar Boulevard will close in front of the plant, located at 12000 Vista Del Mar, on Thursday from 5 to 8 a.m., officials said.

The Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant was the site of a massive sewage spill over summer.

On July 11, 17 million gallons of raw sewage was discharged into the ocean from the plant after debris clogged screens and caused flooding at the facility. Beaches were closed the next day, prompting questions about why it took a day to notify the public about the untreated sewage spill. The spill prompted closures of:

  • Dockweiler State Beach at Water Way Extension;
  • Dockweiler State Beach at Hyperion Plant;
  • El Segundo Beach; and
  • Grand Avenue Storm Drain.

The beaches were reopened July 15 after ocean water samples collected over two days met state standards for acceptable water quality, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.

Crews completed the cleanup process at the plant about two months ago, according to Elena Stern of the Department of Public Works. An investigation into the cause of the spill is continuing.

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