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Home / Neighborhood / San Gabriel Valley / Pasadena Independent / United States Department of State, Pasadena Police Department Sign Memo of Understanding (MOU)

United States Department of State, Pasadena Police Department Sign Memo of Understanding (MOU)

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Chief of police Phillip Sanchez thanks Secretary Brownfield after the signing- Photo by Terry Miller

United States Department of State
And Pasadena Police Department Sign Memo of Understanding (MOU)

On Wednesday, July 25, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) William R. Brownfield and City of Pasadena, Chief of Police Phillip L. Sanchez signed a partnership agreement in city council chambers.

This partnership agreement between INL and Pasadena Police “enables INL to utilize the knowledge and expertise of active serving police officers to train, advise, and mentor foreign law enforcement personnel as part of the Department of State’s numerous foreign assistance programs to further civilian security,” according to a press release issued by the city of Pasadena on Monday.

Assistant Secretary Brownfield recognized the Pasadena Police Department for its recent assistance to the Department of State in sending one of Pasadena’s police officers to support INL’s police programs in Jamaica where the officer advised the U.S. Embassy and Jamaica’s Constabulary Police Force.

The officer, E. Calatayud 111, was recognized by staff and dignitaries for his time in the Caribbean. Calatayud, a 24-year veteran of the force, “was able to offer [Jamaica] the experience of a major U.S. police department in dealing with basic, fundamental police work,” Brownfield said. “What might have taken me years to accomplish he could do in a matter of weeks.”
Ambassador William R. Brownfield was sworn in as Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs on January 10, 2011. Prior to his appointment, Mr. Brownfield served as U.S. Ambassador to Colombia from August 2007 until August 2010.
“I do not have to explain to you how gangs who have their origins in other countries … have an impact on your streets in Pasadena,” the charismatic and eloquent Brownfield told the small handful of media at the press conference late Wednesday.

Before serving in Colombia, Ambassador Brownfield served as U.S. Ambassador to the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and the Republic of Chile. His first assignment after joining the Foreign Service in 1979 was in Maracaibo, Venezuela. Ambassador Brownfield’s other overseas postings also include Counselor for Humanitarian Affairs in Geneva and assignments in Argentina and El Salvador. He was temporarily assigned as Political Adviser to the Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Southern Command in Panama 1989-90.
In Washington, Ambassador Brownfield’s assignments have included Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs (WHA), Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL), Executive Assistant in the Bureau of Inter-American Affairs, Member of the Secretary’s Policy Planning Staff, and Special Assistant to the Under Secretary for Political Affairs.

“The collaboration between the Pasadena Police Department and the State Department INL program highlights the talented and skilled officers within the agency. This partnership enhances the advancement of international training,” said Chief of Police Phillip L. Sanchez.

Elizabeth Vuna, representing Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) read a statement from Schiff saying that Calatayuo’s visit was among “the first steps towards enhanced law enforcement cooperation between the United States and Jamaica … that will result in less crime and drugs on our streets.”
Not everyone agrees with the State Dept.’s attempt to get drugs off the streets and the so called ‘ war on drugs.’
In an OpEd piece published by OpEd News.com, journalist John Grant strongly disagrees with the tactics employed under Brownfield’s command. “William Brownfield is a major architect in the current linkage between the failed Drug War and the War On Terror. He may succeed in making it an even greater failure in the future. Brownfield has been Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement since January 20 of last year. Before that, he was the US ambassador to Colombia; and before that, he was the US ambassador to Venezuela, where he was notorious for taunting President Hugo Chavez.
Mr. Brownfield attended the National War College, and he speaks Spanish with a pronounced Texas accent. He reportedly considers himself a Texan — though, like George W. Bush, he was not born in Texas and has lived much of his life elsewhere. It seems being a “Texan” is a state of mind, especially vis-a-vis Latin America which has been Brownfield’s area of interest. He’s now looking to expand his war-making efforts into Africa.
It’s clear that Mr. Brownfield isn’t one of those striped pants diplomats from foggy bottom determined to keep tempers from reaching the boiling point. He doesn’t seem burdened by doubt, and he seems comfortable strategizing for war.” Grant told his readers July 23.
INL has established relationships with state and local law enforcement, corrections, prosecutorial, and other specialized justice sector institutions to “leverage their expertise in support of the Department of State’s foreign assistance goals.” The State Department pays the salaries of state and local officers while they are deployed. Details of these programs and exchanges are available at: http://www.state.gov/j/inl/civ/index.htm

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